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Signs of Physical Abuse and Domestic Violence

Signs of Physical Abuse and Domestic Violence What is Physical Abuse?



Victims of Physical Abuse undertaken through the setting of domestic violence are defined as individuals who have been subjected to the physical mistreatment, assault, and attacks as a result of physical abuse undertaken by one or both individuals participatory in a romantic relationship:

Unlike other forms of domestic violence and spousal abuse, physical abuse is considered to be amongst the most identifiable; conversely, mental, emotional, and psychological abuse may be absent of physical or observable evidence, resulting in difficulty reporting or prosecuting the abusive party

Physical abuse may range with regard to the severity, action, or measures undertaken within domestic violence cases; while certain physical domestic violence may include brief physical assault, other forms of physical abuse result in severe bodily harm and death

Aggravated physical abuse is defined as an abusers use of items or objects classified as ‘deadly weapons’; in contrast to standard physical abuse, the ramifications of aggravated physical abuse are considered to be amongst the most severe, ranging from critical bodily injury to death

Signs of Physical Abuse and Domestic Violence

Due to the fact that Physical Abuse motivated by domestic violence is defined as the attack or assault of an individual partner through the use of force, violence, or any other variety of physical means intended for bodily harm, the scope of physical abuse may render indication of physical abuse taking place in the forms of bruises, injuries, legions, cuts, scars, and blemishes on the body of a victim. In addition, the signs of physical abuse typically occur on a habitual and consistent basis. The following circumstances are amongst the most common with regard to the identification and recourse of physical abuse:

Domestic Violence in the form of physical can provide law enforcement with noticeable signs of bodily injury; however, this is not always the case – in certain events, fear, guilt, or shame may motivate a victim to attempt to conceal or deny their respective victimization

Amongst the most common responses to identifiable signs of physical abuse resulting from domestic violence is avoidance on the part of the victim of physical abuse; oftentimes – when asked – the victim may attempt to present untruths with regard to the origins of identifiable injuries


Assistance and Resources for Victims of Physical Abuse

In the event that any of the prospective signs and applicable circumstances listed in this article apply to you your current situation – or cases that have occurred in the past – you are encouraged to contact their local authorities or law enforcement department in order to report the details of the offense; you are encouraged to report any type of abuse or abusive situation to which you become privy – ultimately, reporting domestic violence could be a life-saving act. Despite the alarming rate of domestic violence, almost half of domestic violence abuses are not reported; remember – the opportunity to report Domestic Violence offenses in an anonymous fashion is also available to you upon contacting the National Domestic Violence Hotline through their 24-hour telephone number: (800) 799-7233.

5 Tips to Identify Emotional Abuse

5 Tips to Identify Emotional Abuse

Understanding Emotional Abuse

Emotional Abuse is a nature of abuse undertaken through verbal, speech-based harassment; signs of Emotional Abuse can include expressions considered to be insulting, demeaning, hurtful, damaging, and harmful in nature. With regard to Emotional Abuse taking place within the realm of domestic violence, individuals participatory in a romantic relationship may be liable to undergo victimization as a result of emotionally-abusive sentiments and actions facilitated by an abusive partner. 
Various Circumstances Illustrating Signs of Emotional Abuse
Within the scope of this type of abuse, signs of Emotional Abuse will manifest regardless of specifications associated with the nature of the romantic partnership; signs of Emotional Abuse are applicable to married couples, individuals sharing a residence, and individuals dating on a casual basis. Furthermore, the signs of emotional abuse may take place without regard for race, religion, ethnicity, location, or socioeconomic classification; signs of emotional abuse are not subject to limitations with regard to sexual orientation – although less common than heterosexual domestic violence cases, emotional abuse classified as domestic violence does exist within homosexual partnerships.
Identifying the Signs of Emotional Abuse

Domestic Violence can manifest with regard to a variety of undertakings – some of which are visible and easily identifiable while others are not. In certain cases, bruises, injuries, or blemishes may be prominent signs of Physical Domestic Violence; the effects of physical and sexual Domestic Violence may be more evident through the existence of bodily harm and injury, the signs of mental abuse within domestic violence cases may only be evident through testimony or observation:
The existence of shame, guilt, or fear may motivate a victim of mental abuse to abstain from reporting their respective subjection to domestic violence; as a result, the signs of emotional abuse are considered to retain he least identifiable signs of victimization
Observable or identifiable shifts in the behavior of a prospective victim of mental abuse is a common sign of mental abuse; this may also include expressions set forth by the abused partner through avoidance, dishonesty, or the provision of excuses

Threats are Signs of Emotional Abuse 

Threats are defined as the unlawful, conditional expressions of criminal or negative recourse contingent on the behavior of the recipient of the threat itself; threats are typically extortive in nature – aggravated threats include threats posed resulting in murder, rape, or severe bodily injury sustained by a victim of mental abuse. Although the expression of a threat is not physical in nature, habitual expressions of threats within a romantic relationship are considered to be amongst the most substantial signs of emotional abuse.
Reporting Signs of Emotional Abuse

In the event that any of the prospective signs and applicable circumstances listed in this article apply to you your current situation – or cases that have occurred in the past – you are encouraged to contact their local authorities or law enforcement department in order to report the details of the offense; you are encouraged to report any type of abuse, which include signs of emotional abuse to which you become privy – ultimately, reporting domestic violence could be a life-saving act. Despite the alarming rate of domestic violence, almost half of domestic violence abuses are not reported; remember – the opportunity to report Domestic Violence offenses in an anonymous fashion is also available to you upon contacting the National Domestic Violence Hotline through their 24-hour telephone number: (800) 799-7233.

Understanding Sex Abuse and Domestic Violence

Understanding Sex Abuse and Domestic Violence

What is Sex Abuse?
Sex Abuse within the realm of domestic violence is defined as the sexual violation, assault, attack, or harassment taking place within a romantic partnership; as a result of the circumstances resulting from the expressed participation with regard to a romantic partnership, many victims of Sex Abuse may be unaware that they are being – or have been – victimized by Sex Abuse. Furthermore, Sex Abuse takes place without regard for race, religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation, location, or socioeconomic stature.
Sex Abuse in a Romantic Relationship


Sex abuse is considered to be amongst the most sensitive, as well as the most devastating type of abuse facilitated through domestic violence; in many cases, victims of sex abuse within domestic partnerships will undergo a wide range of not only physical, but emotional and psychological trauma, as well. While the parameters expressed with regard to a romantic relationship may imply the engagement in sexually-intimate activity, individual partners are required to act in accordance to any and all legal and ethical requirements with regard to the both the health, wellbeing, and livelihood of their respective partners:
The willing participation in a romantic relationship never constitutes any nature of forced, coerced, threatening, or abusive sexual activity; the required and expressed consent with regard to sexual activity outside of a romantic relationship is applicable to individuals participatory in romantic relationships
In addition, demeaning, insulting, threatening, or harassing remarks and expressions are never permissible within romantic relationships; the protection, respect, and preservation of human rights and liberties are required for individuals both involved – and not involved – in romantic relationships. 
Sex Abuse and Rape

Within the setting of a romantic partnership, the demand for the required consent with regard to any or all participation in sexual activity is mandatory; however, the following legal, ethical, and lawful violations may occur in conjunction to the respective romantic relationship:
Spousal rape is classified as a rape facilitated by one individual onto another individual – both of whom are participatory in romantic relationship or union; this form of rape can take place with regard to individuals who are legally-wed, as well as individuals cohabitating
Domestic Rape is defined as the forced, non-consensual act of sexual intercourse undertaken by one partner onto another through the usage of threat, force, or duress; domestic rape may involve unwed – or legally-married – couples participatory within a romantic relationship
Reporting Sex Abuse within a Romantic Relationship
Despite the wide range of emotions experienced by victims of sex abuse, which may include guilt, shame, fear, or anger, the reporting of sex abuse sustained by an individual victim is oftentimes the most effective sign of sex abuse that would otherwise considered as being unidentifiable. However, despite the many domestic violence cases taking place within modernity, half of these Domestic Violence acts go unreported:
In the event that an individual has been made aware of ongoing Domestic Violence, or has been involved within Domestic Violence cases that have occurred in the past, they are encouraged to contact their local authorities or law enforcement department in order to report the details of the offense; individuals are also given the opportunity to report Domestic Violence offenses in an anonymous fashion; remember, no one deserves to be victimized by Domestic Violence
A multitude of resources and assistance exist; please contact the appropriate government department, such as the National Domestic Violence Hotline through their 24-hour telephone number: (800) 799-7233

Are you Being Abused? Please Read This

Are you Being Abused? Please Read This

Are You Being Abused?
The classification of individuals who are abused is rarely uniform; abuse can occur in a vast expanse of locations, circumstances, and settings – furthermore, the victims, activities, and natures of abuse will vary, as well. As a result, this may cause some confusion upon determining whether or not you – or someone you love – are being abused. 
In the event that you suspect victimization with regard to spousal abuse or domestic violence, you are encouraged to continue reading this article; domestic violence and spousal abuse is considered to be amongst the ultimate betrayals that take place within romantic partnerships and unions – simply put, no one deserves to be abused:

Acknowledging Your Victimization
Domestic violence and spousal abuse can range in nature, including physical, emotional, psychological, and sexual measures undertaker to facilitate the abuse; furthermore, the receipt of threats and insults from a partner are considered to be abuse, as well
You have done nothing to deserve abuse; although the existence of manipulation and exploitation is latent within domestic violence cases – this takes place when such expressions are foisted onto the abused partner from the abuser
Although you may feel afraid, saddened, or betrayed, your health and wellbeing is of the utmost importance; no one – not even a romantic partner – has a right to strip you of your human rights, happiness, and livelihood 

Types of Domestic Violence and Victims of Abuse
The following examples of abuse are associated with the most common reports filed by individuals abused and victimized by domestic violence:
Physical Domestic violence constitutes physical abuse, attack, or assault sustained by one or both members of a romantic partnership
Emotional or Psychological Domestic violence constitutes verbal abuse or assault sustained by one or both members of a cohabitation partnership, including the use of insult, threats, and manipulation
Sexual Domestic Violence constitutes sexual abuse sustained by one or both members of a romantic partnership, including spousal rape, sexual abuse, and sexual assault


Identifying Threats
Individuals who have been abused are not subject to any specific type of abuse; as previously stated, victims can be abused throughout a variety of natures and methodology – however, the receipt of habitual or dangerous threats are also considered to be a serious form of abuse:
The expression of a threat is defined as the unlawful, conditional expressions of criminal or negative recourse contingent on the behavior of the recipient of the threat itself; threats are typically extortive in nature, which may include the promise of physical, emotional, or sexual harm
Aggravated threats include threats posed towards the abused partner, which make mention of the prospective enactment of murder, rape, or sever bodily harm

Assistance and Resources for Abused Individuals
In the event that any of the prospective signs and applicable circumstances listed in this article apply to you your current situation – or cases that have occurred in the past – you are encouraged to contact their local authorities or law enforcement department in order to report the details of the offense; you are encouraged to report any type of abuse or abusive situation to which you become privy – ultimately, reporting domestic violence could be a life-saving act. 
Despite the alarming rate of domestic violence, almost half of domestic violence abuses are not reported; remember – the opportunity to report Domestic Violence offenses in an anonymous fashion is also available to you upon contacting the National Domestic Violence Hotline through their 24-hour telephone number: (800) 799-7233.

6 Important Facts about Abusive Relationship Signs

6 Important Facts about Abusive Relationship Signs

Understanding Abusive Relationship Signs
Abusive Relationship Signs are the aftereffects of domestic violence, which result from abuse sustained by one or both of the individuals participatory within an abusive relationship. Due to the fact that the nature of domestic violence undertaken varies with regard to the activity, victims, and circumstances, abusive relationship signs will vary, as well. 
The identification of physical abuse and observable trauma are amongst the most identifiable abusive relationship signs, emotional, mental, psychological – and even sexual abuse – can be more difficult to detect by friends and family members. In many cases, the testimony of the abused victim is the primary identifier of abuse that is not classified as ‘physical’; unfortunately, non-physical abusive relationship signs neither observed nor reported may go undetected.

Physical Abusive Relationship Signs
While the notice of Physical bruising – or any additional forms of identifiable physical harm – is amongst the most common Effects of Domestic Violence and Spousal Abuse, acts of self-mutilation and self-injury are considered to be amongst the most common abusive relationships signs undertaken by the victim themselves. 
Anguish, anger, or shame experienced by a victim of domestic violence as a result of abuse may lead to that individual undergoing self-mutilation as means to not only relieve stress and rage, but also as a means to quell feelings of self-loathing and self-punishment.
Emotional Abusive Relationship Signs
The victim may adamantly avoid any discussion with regard to the stasis of their relationship, the report of daily events, socially-reclusive behavior, or the origin of any or all unexplained physical bruising. Abusive Relationships signs may include the victim appearing as nervous, angry, agitated, or frightened; in many cases, abusive relationship signs manifest themselves in rampant changes in behavior and activity – in many cases, abusive relationship signs may render dishonesty or the exclusion of details on the part of the abused victim.

The Importance of Reporting Abusive Relationship Signs
Although the various accounts of domestic violence are subject to variation with regard to the details, severity, and the victims involved, the act of reporting abusive relationship signs to which you become privy may result in the saving of the life of a victim of abuse. 
Women are cited as 85% of the individuals victimized by domestic violence; as a result, actions undertaken involving the reporting of abusive relationships signs allow individuals the opportunity to enact, promote, and undertake alterations in behaviors and patterns with regard to the prevention of Domestic Violence.

Reporting Abusive Relationship Signs

In the event that any of the prospective signs and applicable circumstances listed in this article apply to you your current situation – or cases that have occurred in the past – you are encouraged to contact their local authorities or law enforcement department in order to report the details of the offense. Despite the alarming rate of domestic violence, almost half of domestic violence abuses are not reported; remember – the opportunity to report 
Domestic Violence offenses in an anonymous fashion is also available to you upon contacting the National Domestic Violence Hotline through their 24-hour telephone number: (800) 799-7233.

4 Facts about Abusive Relationships

4 Facts about Abusive Relationships

The Definition of Abusive Relationships
Although rarely uniform, Abusive Relationships are defined as unhealthy, damaging, and destructive partnerships involving individuals who are linked in a romantic fashion; despite the varying types of Abusive Relationships, the end result of all Abusive Relationships involves the victimization of one or both partners as a result of abuse. 
Although Abusive Relationships typically involve partners who at one time or another agreed to participate within a joint partnership – ranging from casual dating to marriage – the existence of abuse, neglect, cruelty, or duress is neither permitted nor legal:
In many cases, individuals who have been victimized by Abusive Relationships have cited that they felt a multitude of emotions upon the consideration of leaving an abusive relationship, ranging from fear to guilt
However, psychological findings illustrate that remaining within Abusive Relationships can result in a wide range of devastation and tragedy – in certain cases, these results may be fatal

Types of Abusive Relationships
Although domestic violence varies with regard to location, religion, ethnicity, race, and socioeconomic classification, the aftereffects of abusive relationships are uniform; abuse sustained by one or both of the romantic partners result in both physical and emotional devastation – the following are the most common types of abusive relationships:
Abusive relationships classified as emotional in nature may include domestic violence enacted in a physical manner, which constitutes physical abuse or assault sustained a member of a romantic partnership at the hands of another member of the romantic partnership
Abusive relationships classified as emotional in nature may include domestic violence enacted in an emotional or psychological manner, which constitutes verbal abuse or the demeaning of a member of a romantic partnership as expressed by another member of the romantic partnership
Abusive relationships considered to be sexual in nature may include domestic violence enacted in a sexual manner, which constitutes physical sexual abuse or sexually-charged verbal assault or harassment sustained a member of a romantic partnership as a result of the expression

The Cycle of Abuse and Abusive Relationships
The Cycle of Abuse is a psychological methodology founded by Dr. Lenore Walker, who is considered to be amongst the most prominent specialists with regard to the analysis of abusive relationships; this cycle is considered to manifest on a habitual and repetitive basis within abusive relationships – within her study, she outlines the 4 behavioral phases latent within abusive relationships:
The ‘Tension’ phase; the first phase in which fear and anxiety is spawned within the abused partner, which is facilitated by the abusive partner
The ‘Incident’ Phase; the second phase in which the abusive act or expression takes place
The ‘Reconciliation’ Phase; the third phase in which the abuser expresses an apology and remorse for their respective actions
The ‘Calm’ Phase; the fourth phase in which past abusive activity is subsequently forgotten and forgiven

Ending Abusive Relationships and Recovery
Domestic Violence assistance allows for the provision of helpful and preventative resources that are available for victims of domestic violence due to their respective involvement in abusive relationships; however, despite the many domestic violence cases taking place within modernity, half of these 
Domestic Violence acts go unreported. In the event that an individual has been made aware of ongoing Domestic Violence, or has been involved within Domestic Violence cases that have occurred in the past, they are encouraged to contact their local authorities or law enforcement department in order to report the details of the offense:
A multitude of resources and assistance exist; please contact the appropriate government department, such as the National Domestic Violence Hotline through their 24-hour telephone number: (800) 799-7233
Individuals are also given the opportunity to report Domestic Violence offenses in an anonymous fashion; remember, no one deserves to be victimized by Domestic Violence

Guide to Understanding the ‘Cycle of Abuse

 Guide to Understanding the ‘Cycle of AbuseWhat is the ‘Cycle of Abuse’?



The ‘Cycle of Abuse’ serves to illustrate the methodology, process, and systematic manifestation of abusive relationships; this ideology not only outlines the events leading up to domestic violence cases, but also the itemization of the gradual unfolding of events resulting in domestic violence. 
The psychological ideology defining the Cycle of Abuse was created by clinical psychologist Dr. Lenore Walker, considered to be amongst the pioneers of psychology with regard studies of domestic violence and abused women – however, a primary tenet of the ‘Cycle of Abuse’ study indicates the repetitive nature of the abuse, which is facilitated by the events taking place resulting from this cycle.

The 4 Stages of the Cycle of Abuse Study


Within the Cycle of Abuse study, Dr. Walker cites the 4 stages of abuse and domestic violence; these stages range from the inception of domestic violence to the tragic and devastating aftereffects:

‘Tension Building’



The building – or rising – of tension is considered to be the first phase of the Cycle of Abuse, which manifests itself through passive aggression, the facilitation of distance on the part of the abuser towards the abused partner, and the establishment of a nervous, tense, and agitated state within the romantic relationship:

The ‘Tension’ phase results in a heightened sense of fear and anxiety on the part of the abused partner

‘The Incident’


The enactment of the abusive incident in question is considered to be the second phase of the Cycle of Abuse, which is classified as the abusive action or expression manifesting itself; abuse taking place within the ‘incident’ phase can include spousal abuse that is physical, emotional, or sexual in nature:

The ‘Incident’ phase results in the establishment of intimidation in order to facilitate the abuse taking place

‘Reconciliation’
The enactment of reconciliation undertaken by both individuals participatory within the abusive relationship is considered to be the third phase of the Cycle of Abuse, which involves the abuser expressing remorse for their respective actions; however, Dr. Walker warns that habitual abusers seldom – if ever – enact sincere apologies – in these cases, the expression of remorse or apology will typically include excuses, validation, or minimization with regard to the abuse sustained:

In certain cases, the ‘Reconciliation’ phase may involve the abuser denying the abuse that had taken place; Dr. Walker cites that this denial may result in the proliferation of self-doubt and guilt within the abused partner

‘Calm’


The sense of calm and peace subsequent to the abusive incident is considered to be the fourth phase of the Cycle of Abuse, which involves the period following the apology or expressed sense of remorse on the part of the abuser; during this phase, the abuser will typically present a temporary change in behavior absent of the ability to maintain that change on a permanent basis – furthermore, Dr. Walker explains that during the ‘Calm’ phase, the respective romantic partners may feel a sense of extreme closeness:

Typically, a sentiment of forgiveness or disregard for the prior abuse is not only implicit, but expected within the ‘Calm’ phase; however, the danger reported within the ‘Cycle of Abuse’ study is primarily evident with regard to the repetitive nature innate within this cycle


Reporting Abusive Relationship Signs


In the event that any of the prospective signs and applicable circumstances latent within the Cycle of Abuse are applicable to you your current situation – or cases that have occurred in the past – you are encouraged to contact their local authorities or law enforcement department in order to report the details of the offense; you are encouraged to report any type of abuse or abusive relationship signs to which you become privy – ultimately, reporting domestic violence could be a life-saving act. 
Despite the alarming rate of domestic violence, almost half of domestic violence abuses are not reported; remember – the opportunity to report Domestic Violence offenses in an anonymous fashion is also available to you upon contacting the National Domestic Violence Hotline through their 24-hour telephone number: (800) 799-7233.

How Drug Abuse May Lead to Domestic Violence

How Drug Abuse May Lead to Domestic Violence

What is Drug Abuse?
Narcotics – or ‘drugs’ – are defined as illegal substances whose usage, possession, and exchange is classified as criminal offense. Within the realm of narcotics, various types of drugs exist; each individual drug retains an individual level of additive properties, effects of usage, and physiological ramifications resulting from its respective usage. Drug abuse is classified as the illicit, improper, or excessive usage of illegal drugs, as well as controlled substances.
Controlled Substances and Drug Abuse
Controlled Substances are defined as items whose usage and possession is inherently legal only in the event that the individual in possession is in ownership of the expressed, authoritative permission to do so; individuals engaging in the usage or possession of such substances are liable to be charged with drug charges congruent with illegal drug charges. 
For example, a prescription for pain medication from an accredited physician allows an individual to be in possession of such medication; the illegal sale of that medication to authorized individuals is considered to be a crime – regardless of a substance classified as illegal or controlled, addiction or excessive usage is classified as drug abuse.
Drug Abuse and Domestic Violence
Although an abuser may not be abusive in nature, drug abuse or drug addiction may elicit abusive behaviors and activities; the following types of domestic violence or spousal abuse may result from the effects of drug abuse undertaken by one or both partners in a romantic relationship:
Neglect and Drug Abuse
Drug abuse may lead to excessive usage or addition to narcotics, resulting in the irresponsible spending of monies or funds, as well as the theft of monies belonging to a partner of a romantic relationship. As a result, neglect is described as delinquency with regard to the provision of the well-being and welfare with a romantic partnership.

Emotional Abuse and Drug Abuse
Emotional and Psychological will typically include verbal insult or emotional debasement; the effects of abuse of this nature is considered to be amongst the most difficult to identify.
Sexual Abuse and Drug Abuse
Sexual Abuse may contain inappropriate sexual activity undertaken with a spouse or partner, including spousal rape, sexual harassment, and molestation.
Physical Abuse and Drug Abuse
Physical Abuse may include the assault, attack, and harming of one or both partners of a romantic relationship through the use of force, violence, or any other variety of physical means intended for bodily harm; physical trauma and injury are common effects of abuse of this nature


Reporting Drug Abuse and Domestic Violence

Despite the alarming numbers expressed within available Domestic Violence Facts, many Domestic Violence acts go unreported; in the event that an individual has been made aware of ongoing Domestic Violence, or has been involved within Domestic Violence cases that have occurred in the past, they are encouraged to contact their local authorities or law enforcement department in order to report the details of the offense:
A multitude of resources and assistance exist; please contact the appropriate government department, such as the National Domestic Violence Hotline through their 24-hour telephone number: (800) 799-7233
To report addiction or drug abuse, please contact the Partnership for a Drug-Free America through their telephone number (212) 922-1560
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